Close Encounters of the Presidential Kind

George Herbert Walker Bush (and George W. Bush) Back in the year 2000, my father turned eighty. I was at a loss as to what I could give him to celebrate–like many another elderly gentleman, he had everything he needed and wanted nothing. I’d heard that the White House would send birthday greetings to seniors on their reaching major milestones: eighty, ninety, and one hundred … Continue reading Close Encounters of the Presidential Kind

Ghost Soldiers

The Bataan Death March. Most of those interested in World War II know about the 75 mile forced march along the Bataan Peninsula in the Philippines in 1942. It wasn’t meant to be nearly as brutal and deadly as it happened, but a confluence of factors contributed to the unfortunate circumstances–largely the unpreparedness of the Japanese when faced with the sheer number of prisoners and … Continue reading Ghost Soldiers

Shimpai Nai (No Worry)

One of the side benefits of writing World War II stories is the opportunity to stand next to one of the dwindling number of veterans who were there, who witnessed the war up close and personal, and who are here to remind us about the war’s purpose. James Stockton is one of those veterans. He is a former marine–if there is such a thing. I’m … Continue reading Shimpai Nai (No Worry)

Little Known Little People and a Big War

America took years to mobilize its war production capabilities for World War I. President Franklin Roosevelt was determined not to have that happen for the Second World War. In 1940, he turned to America’s industries and their understanding of mechanization and mass production for help. Ford Motor Company was one of the companies that answered Roosevelt’s call. By 1941 the company’s Willow Run factory near … Continue reading Little Known Little People and a Big War

After D-Day

The events occurring on D-Day, June 6, 1944, nearly seventy-five years ago, are widely celebrated in books, films, and on any number of web sites. Some call the landings on the beaches of Normandy the most celebrated battle of the war—though there were others of equal scope and ferocity in Europe and the Pacific. But D-Day is just that, the day the invasion began and, … Continue reading After D-Day