WWII in Our Backyards – Georgia

Frank Merrill, William Darby, and James Rudder. Who were they and what do they have in common? Frank Merrill’s name is perhaps the most well-known of the three, the man having been the subject of a number of books and Hollywood movies. Brigadier General Frank D. Merrill headed the 5307th Composite Unit in the China-Burma-India theater during World War II. The unit, also known as “Galahad” … Continue reading WWII in Our Backyards – Georgia

Corporal Louis Thompson Honored

What a thrill to see one of the 19 World War II veterans profiled in my upcoming book honored today. Late last year, the Governor of Georgia Elect’s office asked for nominations from the community of highly decorated Georgia veterans to be honored guests at Governor Kemp’s inauguration. I nominated Corporal Louis Thompson, who I had come to know over the last several months as … Continue reading Corporal Louis Thompson Honored

Christmas at Wartime

During the Revolutionary War, for at least some soldiers there was no thought of celebrating Christmas. On the eve of December 25, 1776, then General George Washington crossed the frozen Delaware River to lead his cold, hungry, and tired, troops to one of the decisive battles of the war. One hundred years later, during the Civil War, the war stopped for Christmas. Troops on both … Continue reading Christmas at Wartime

Close Encounters of the Presidential Kind

George Herbert Walker Bush (and George W. Bush) Back in the year 2000, my father turned eighty. I was at a loss as to what I could give him to celebrate–like many another elderly gentleman, he had everything he needed and wanted nothing. I’d heard that the White House would send birthday greetings to seniors on their reaching major milestones: eighty, ninety, and one hundred … Continue reading Close Encounters of the Presidential Kind

Ghost Soldiers

The Bataan Death March. Most of those interested in World War II know about the 75 mile forced march along the Bataan Peninsula in the Philippines in 1942. It wasn’t meant to be nearly as brutal and deadly as it happened, but a confluence of factors contributed to the unfortunate circumstances–largely the unpreparedness of the Japanese when faced with the sheer number of prisoners and … Continue reading Ghost Soldiers