Ten on a Topic: China

Its History, Its People and Culture, and its Designs for the Future In his most prophetic and frightening statement in his book, On China, Kissinger cites Immanuel Kant’s argument that perpetual peace will come to the world in one of two ways: “by human insight or by catastrophes of a magnitude that leave us no other choice.” And, he says, we are at that juncture. Those … Continue reading Ten on a Topic: China

WWII Historical Fiction: The Enduring Interest

It may be D-Day and the Normandy invasion all over again. If you don’t believe me, take a glance at the number of books about World War II swarming bookshelves this year. I’ve given up trying to find an accurate count. Goodreads identified 61 newly released WWII novels at midyear, compared with 100 last year at this time. While Amazon had no trouble finding 100 … Continue reading WWII Historical Fiction: The Enduring Interest

“We Were Soldiers” and Wielded Pens

Lt. Gen. Harold G. Moore and journalist Joe Galloway, who once accompanied Moore into the field, wrote the acclaimed book We Were Soldiers Once … and Young about a battle in the Ia Drang Valley of Vietnam. The book, published in 1992, was a New York Times Bestseller. We don’t often think of our military leaders as writers outside the very narrow realm of treatises on war … Continue reading “We Were Soldiers” and Wielded Pens

Like Minds — A WWII Reading List

By now I imagine and, having done my part, fervently hope, everyone knows 2020 is the 75th anniversary of the end of the Second World War. If not, there’s one more opportunity to catch up on the events, the issues, and the ordinary and extraordinary people who lived through the war years. On August 30, the New York Times devoted its Book Review to books … Continue reading Like Minds — A WWII Reading List

Soldiers as Readers? Indeed.

You might not think of our men and women in uniform as “readers,” but you would be wrong. The army, navy, marines, air force, and coast guard all consider reading (and reading widely) as critical for career advancement. Courtesy of DODReads.com, a site dedicated to furthering reading and lifelong learning—especially for those who aspire to a career in the armed forces—you can peruse the list … Continue reading Soldiers as Readers? Indeed.

The USS Indianapolis + 75 Years

Georgia Men Among the Crew of the Ill-fated USS Indianapolis in 1945 Seventy-five years ago, only minutes past midnight on July 30, 1945, the Imperial Japanese submarine I-58 launched two torpedoes in the dark waters of the south Pacific. They sped toward the USS Indianapolis striking her in the bow and at midship. The story of what transpired following the attack is well known to navy veterans and WWII historians and … Continue reading The USS Indianapolis + 75 Years

Ten on a Topic: Understanding Normandy

“Rommel, you magnificent bastard, I read your book.” George C. Scott utters those words in a scene from the 1970 film Patton. With that gloating comment, the general reveals to the audience how he defeated the infamous Wehrmacht field marshal. He read his book. I would venture the same goes for almost anything in life including learning about D-Day and the battles waged in Normandy or enhancing a … Continue reading Ten on a Topic: Understanding Normandy

A Witness to the Start of D-Day

The Neyland home, a bright white house with a long narrow front porch, sits back from the street and is surrounded by the last of spring’s pink and lavender blooms. It’s a quiet street, two blocks off a thoroughfare in Marietta, Georgia, and four thousand miles from where James once stood guard and witnessed the start of the invasion of Normandy on a night in … Continue reading A Witness to the Start of D-Day

A Military Man Is Mentored through Books

Meet Dr. Jean Gilnord Mathurin, medical officer in the United States Navy and firm believer in the power of books. And, keep reading to learn more about the military and its reading recommendations. Dr Mathurin is a Haitian immigrant who raised himself from dishwasher to a US Naval Medical Officer. He shared his perspective on books and what he believes are the keys to success … Continue reading A Military Man Is Mentored through Books

The King and the War

Despite a desire to serve their country in any capacity they could, at the start of the Second World War the military was reluctant to allow blacks to enlist. If they did enlist local draft boards often passed blacks over in favor of white recruits, resulting in fewer than 4,000 black troops and a mere dozen black officers in the ranks in late 1941. Eventually, … Continue reading The King and the War